a (mostly) handmade Halloween

Standard

IMG_3396

We had a ghoulishly fun time around here yesterday.  I hope you did as well!  I loved seeing photos of friends’ kiddos posted on Facebook yesterday and on the 30th which is Beggar’s Night in Des Moines ( during times like these, I’m so glad I didn’t shut down my FB account…)  The Sprouts were thrilled to have our decs out this year since last year our beloved Halloween items were still in boxes since we’d just relocated.  All three kiddos added to the mix with homemade bats, spiders, and spooky finger knitted garlands for the stairs!  We also opted for a combo of handmade costumes and Goodwill finds in an attempt to tone down the holiday and be a bit more frugal.  At first, I was a bit concerned that they would balk at this idea since, like every other kid, they adore the store bought variety.  (It doesn’t help matters that Halloween catalogs start showing up in the mail mid-August!)   Instead, they were off and running with the idea!  The boys drew countless diagrams of JedI costumes until they solidified the designs.  And, it was a great lesson in measuring and economics as we figured out how much fabric we needed and priced the fabric to figure out the most frugal options.  They also had to get creative in reinterpreting their costumes for school.  Juniper Ridge Community School sent out a costume policy that prohibited scary costumes, masks and costumes based on movies, TV shows, and video games.  In addition, the costumes needed to be “archetypal” which wasn’t clearly defined in the school’s typical vague Waldorf way.  Despite the multiple constraints, I was really impressed with what the boys came up with on their own.  And, truly, when you look at a Jedi robe what do you see?…….monk attire!  So, they decided that they were still Obi won Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker but that they were on a secret intergalactic mission and thus in disguise as Monk Kenobi and Monk Skywalker.  We found writing plumes to replace the light sabers and they constructed their own “Bibles” in which to “scribe” (this idea was heavily influenced by The Story of the World, Volume 2!).  And, I’m pleased to say, the monks made it though the school costume parade without detection!

Our tiniest Sprout lucked out at Goodwill with a $5 velvet witch dress (with very cool spiderweb sheer sleeves and a spider brooch!), a $3 Dolly Parton-ish wig, and 75 cent witches hat.  We pinned the hat to the voluminous wig and she was good to go!  She was super thrilled to be a witch with Mommy (I found a beautiful $7 dress at Goodwill too).  We also made some very easy ghoulish eats throughout the weeeeek: sugar spider cookies, cheese ball and blue tortilla witches hats, spider nest pies (chicken pot pie variation), apple teeth, tangerine pumpkins, and worm crusted eyeball pie as the grand finale last night (a spaghetti pie).  Easy.  Yummy.  (And lots of fun.)

I looked at several online tutorials before attempting to make the robes and vests.  Instead of making a pattern, I each boy lay down on the fabric while I drew the costume freehand with an old piece of soap.

I looked at several online tutorials before attempting to make the robes and vests. Instead of making a pattern, I had each boy lay down on the fabric while I drew the costume freehand with an old piece of soap.

monks

monks

Our wonderful and amazing hairdresser offered to attach the finger crocheted yarn "braids" to the boys' hair.  She used an extension bead and the boys started Halloween night feeling like real Jedi knights!

Our wonderful and amazing hairdresser offered to attach the finger crocheted yarn “braids” to the boys’ hair (they came up with the idea and made them themselves!). She used an extension bead and the boys started Halloween night feeling like real Jedi knights!

About these ads

2 responses »

  1. I cannot believe how big your kids have gotten. The boys could be twins! Thanks for sharing! Hope you are doing well in Colorado. I would love to live in that state!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s